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  #1  
Old 08-29-2019, 01:39 PM
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aftermarket oil cooler?

Hi guys ,

I want to replace both engine and transmission oil cooler. This time the engine oil cooler failed and it did a big mess.

Does anyone know a good brand ?

My car is x5 e53 2002

Ps : is there any specific reason why this oil coolers fail often ? Itís happening almost every summer on super hot days
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  #2  
Old 08-29-2019, 05:56 PM
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From information in your other threads, I think you are running a GM transmission form a 5-series in your M57 (3.0d)? Is that correct.

I also assume the oil cooler you are referring to is the transmission oil cooler?

These oil coolers don't normally fail as often as you indicate.... what is the failure mode? Perhaps the transmission swap has introduced a variable into the system that the factory parts can't cope with...
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Old 08-30-2019, 02:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wpoll View Post
From information in your other threads, I think you are running a GM transmission form a 5-series in your M57 (3.0d)? Is that correct.

I also assume the oil cooler you are referring to is the transmission oil cooler?

These oil coolers don't normally fail as often as you indicate.... what is the failure mode? Perhaps the transmission swap has introduced a variable into the system that the factory parts can't cope with...
It's so strange to happen every summer, the reason that i replaced my transmission was the water getting inside becouse of oil cooler failure.
Basically they brake inside and water and oil mixes together (i think you already know)

This time my engine oil cooler also failed.

I have never found the issue of it , thermostat issue maybe, water pump ?

edit: yes i have a 5 speed transmission GM from 5 series!
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Old 08-30-2019, 03:25 AM
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What coolant are you running? Perhaps it is too caustic and damaging the cooling system components?
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  #5  
Old 08-30-2019, 03:27 AM
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Blue Coolant , i don't remember the brand but it was around $9 per liter
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Old 08-30-2019, 06:34 AM
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OK, sounds like your coolant shouldn't be an issue. What brand of heat exchanger (oil cooler) did you use last time (any time) you replaced it? I see cheap aftermarket units for as low as USD$30 and BMW ones for USD$250...
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Old 08-30-2019, 06:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raydhimitri View Post
... This time my engine oil cooler also failed....
Which cooler are you referring to when you say the engine oil cooler also failed?

Are you referring to part #12 on this diagram?



This is a very simlar unit to the transmission heat exchanger on the back of the radiator. Both have coolant flowing through them to transfer heat from the oil/fluid.

If you have "blown" both of these at the same time, I'd have to think that there is something wrong in your cooling system, something that allows the cooling system pressure to rise to dangerous levels when very hot. The expansion tank cap should [revent this from happening and I would have thought eh expansion tank would explode long before either of these heat exchnagers would rupture (internally). Maybe the thermostat is a good place to start but I jusy cannot see how the pressure could rise high enough to be the cause....
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Last edited by wpoll; 08-30-2019 at 06:55 AM.
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Old 08-30-2019, 07:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wpoll View Post
Which cooler are you referring to when you say the engine oil cooler also failed?

Are you referring to part #12 on this diagram?



This is a very simlar unit to the transmission heat exchanger on the back of the radiator. Both have coolant flowing through them to transfer heat from the oil/fluid.

If you have "blown" both of these at the same time, I'd have to think that there is something wrong in your cooling system, something that allows the cooling system pressure to rise to dangerous levels when very hot. The expansion tank cap should [revent this from happening and I would have thought eh expansion tank would explode long before either of these heat exchnagers would rupture (internally). Maybe the thermostat is a good place to start but I jusy cannot see how the pressure could rise high enough to be the cause....
edit: YES IM REFERRING TO #12 , im also thinking for an thermostat issue .
Both of heat exchangers fail internally , and the bad thing is that most of the times when they fail water gets in oil and not oil in water

This time (4 days ago) the engine oil cooler failed , i thought it was the transmission oil cooler becouse it had the same color (milky white) in Expansion Tank.

I replaced the transmission oil cooler and flushed the cooling system.

The next day i noticed i had no sign of oil in dipstick and that was one the signs that the engine oil cooler also failed

Still trying to figure out what might be wrong , car does not overheat at all
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Old 08-30-2019, 07:22 AM
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I found this theory relating to your problem on another forum - I'm not saying it's your issue but it possble...

(from Vector57 on M5board.com)...
Given the circumstances of the fault, I would suspect the root cause of the leak developing in
the side of the heat exchanger was due to coolant electrolysis. Old, "spent coolant" (depleted
additives) turns into a conductor, the same process you have in a battery with it's electrolyte.
All of the aluminum in the engine/cooling systems now become the source for ionic transfer of
material, literally dissolving the aluminum. The thinner the material, the sooner the leakage/failure.
This is why the radiator, heater core and in your case, the heat exchanger are the first to suffer.
It is imperative the tech working on your car should determine just how great this process has
evolved, before draining the old coolant. It is a very simple process to measure; Using a digital
voltmeter (DVOM), place the negative lead on a solid ground on the engine and place the positive
probe into the coolant (do not allow probe to contact anything but coolant). If more than 0.3 volts
DC is present, you have a seriously compromised system. To help determine if it is from a poor
chassis/engine ground, remove one of the battery cables; if no change in voltage, it is not an errant
ground path. However, second to old, "spent" coolant, the usual culprit is high series resistance in a
ground path. This turns the coolant into a weak conductor, and the electrolytic process starts
escalating. The worst of the offenders is first, the starter followed by alternator and ignition system.
All of this can be remedied by cleaning all of the ground connections and in some cases, the addition
of additional "bonding jumpers" between chassis and components (especially the starter).

At this point I would strongly urge you to replace the radiator as well, after the engine and heater
core have been thoroughly flushed. Trust me on this one, your radiator is right on the verge of
developing it's own series of pin-hole leaks. Hopefully, the heater core will be OK with fresh coolant.


Might be worth doing the voltmenter test just to be sure... 'casue something sure is tearing your heat exchnagers to peices!
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2005 BMW X5 3.0d (b 02/05)
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  #10  
Old 08-30-2019, 09:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wpoll View Post
I found this theory relating to your problem on another forum - I'm not saying it's your issue but it possble...

(from Vector57 on M5board.com)...
Given the circumstances of the fault, I would suspect the root cause of the leak developing in
the side of the heat exchanger was due to coolant electrolysis. Old, "spent coolant" (depleted
additives) turns into a conductor, the same process you have in a battery with it's electrolyte.
All of the aluminum in the engine/cooling systems now become the source for ionic transfer of
material, literally dissolving the aluminum. The thinner the material, the sooner the leakage/failure.
This is why the radiator, heater core and in your case, the heat exchanger are the first to suffer.
It is imperative the tech working on your car should determine just how great this process has
evolved, before draining the old coolant. It is a very simple process to measure; Using a digital
voltmeter (DVOM), place the negative lead on a solid ground on the engine and place the positive
probe into the coolant (do not allow probe to contact anything but coolant). If more than 0.3 volts
DC is present, you have a seriously compromised system. To help determine if it is from a poor
chassis/engine ground, remove one of the battery cables; if no change in voltage, it is not an errant
ground path. However, second to old, "spent" coolant, the usual culprit is high series resistance in a
ground path. This turns the coolant into a weak conductor, and the electrolytic process starts
escalating. The worst of the offenders is first, the starter followed by alternator and ignition system.
All of this can be remedied by cleaning all of the ground connections and in some cases, the addition
of additional "bonding jumpers" between chassis and components (especially the starter).

At this point I would strongly urge you to replace the radiator as well, after the engine and heater
core have been thoroughly flushed. Trust me on this one, your radiator is right on the verge of
developing it's own series of pin-hole leaks. Hopefully, the heater core will be OK with fresh coolant.


Might be worth doing the voltmenter test just to be sure... 'casue something sure is tearing your heat exchnagers to peices!
wow, we never do this kind of tests in here . I will test it and i will post again here

Thanks for your help
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