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  #11  
Old 12-10-2017, 05:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Skyline View Post
What makes you think a typical tire shop is going to have a 3/4" torque wrench? And if it does, they probably use the thing as a breaker bar, and ruined any chance of accuracy. Most tire shops just use their air guns for everything. Not a good plan.

There are auto parts stores that rent tools, but a 3/4" torque wrench is a not a common tool unless you work on trucks.

The problem with your plan, is that if you over-torque or under torque the wheel bearing (and drive on it), you're going to ruin it. Or it will be fine, and fail again in a few months. And once it's overtorqued, the damage is done. Get your hands on a proper torque wrench BEFORE you do the job. There are decent used torque wrenches on eBay, (search for Snap-on 3/4" Torque wrench) but they start at several hundred dollars; about 30-40% of new cost. This is a HUGE torque wrench, and they don't come cheap. Here's an example of a new one:

https://store.snapon.com/US-Torque-I...e-P891640.aspx


While Snap-on is certainly top shelf, at 3/4" drive there are not the vast options available at 1/2" drive. And if you buy used, you're going to need to send it back to Snap-on or CDI to get it calibrated before you use it. You can also hand it to a Snap-on mobile dealer. Expect to pay another $100 or so for this service including return shipping. But you'll still save several hundred or more vs. buying new. CDI makes most of Snap-on's torque wrenches, and the CDI labeled products run a bit less money than the Snap-on, but still you're talking $550 or so for a new one.
That is good advice. I always torque to spec when I work on things. I agree that most use their guns, I would do the same. I guess it would be better to take to BMW and have them torque it down, and charge me for 30 min labor. That sounds like a plan.

My gun wouldn't over torque I'm sure, but if I can get to 250+ torque lbs vs 330 or whatever it is, I can't see that causing it to fail.
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  #12  
Old 12-10-2017, 10:06 PM
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Originally Posted by devildogae View Post
That is good advice. I always torque to spec when I work on things. I agree that most use their guns, I would do the same. I guess it would be better to take to BMW and have them torque it down, and charge me for 30 min labor. That sounds like a plan.

My gun wouldn't over torque I'm sure, but if I can get to 250+ torque lbs vs 330 or whatever it is, I can't see that causing it to fail.
If you're going to do this job yourself, have the right tools on hand. If you're off on the torque of the center nut, you could very possibly destroy the brand new bearing, even with a short drive. If you don't want to buy a 3/4" torque wrench, find someone who knows the technique to torque to the max with a 1/2" torque wrench with the follow-up rotation, (similar to a torque angle spec.) This is an unofficial workaround. I believe it can be found in one of the mechanic's software programs like Identifix, or Mitchell. Otherwise, let a competent mechanic/dealer do the WHOLE job.

BTW, my 1/2" impact will do 800ft lbs tightening, and over 1,000 to remove stuff. My 3/8" gun will be just about right though; it's rated at 325ft lbs.

Your X5 is a "Modern Era" BMW in that many bolt/nuts are single use, torque-to-yield or just normal fasteners that really are critical for torque. I would never consider using an air gun to put on an axle bolt, or a wheel nut, although Japanese cars tend to have MUCH more fragile wheel studs than the BMW bolts...by FAR.
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Old 04-17-2018, 07:51 PM
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Just wanted to update this thread. Got the job done today. My X5 didnt have the electric ebrake servo motor attached to the calipers, so that made it much easier. I did get a 3/4" breaker bar and electric torque wrench attachment capable of 800 foot pounds.

I highly suggest getting a new hub along with the wheel bearing. I had a bearing installer/puller I used to press the hub into the wheel bearing. I did have to take the ebrake off, but it's simple once you know how. Getting any long wrench in for the wheel bearing bolts was very difficult. I could not get a torque wrench on them (4) but I got them very very tight. I aldo bought a axle puller to I was able to pull the axle once hub was installed. I aldo had to rent a hub puller, but I get my money back on that once returned to advanced auto.

I did make a rookie mistake, pushed the brake petal trying to start the car, and freaking caliper piston came out. I ripped the boot trying to Install. Ordered one from BMW to the sum of $80, dang!! Needless to say I bleed the brake fluids also. It wasn't the most horrible job ever but I don't want to do it again anytime soon.
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