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  #1  
Old 04-13-2019, 01:06 AM
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Join Date: May 2010
Location: Australia
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simt is on a distinguished road
caught diesel injector failure on Inpa

Hi all,
I wanted to share this to add to the community knowledge base.

I had a diesel injector die on our bmw X5 3.0sd (35d) with the M57TU2 engine.
I was lucky enough to have actually caught the signs of it failing in Inpa hours before the injector failed.


https://youtu.be/FicbKEFSSgI

Have a look at Cylinder 5.

We were heading out to family in the country on a 6hr drive. My wife was taking a turn driving, I had the laptop in the car, so on a whim checked out the live data with Inpa and saw what cylinder 5 was struggling. I think 'Selective Mass Adjustment' is similar to fuel compensation or some such. 3 hrs later and only half an hour from getting into Mildura the car died. I've had two injectors die on me before and I knew this was exactly the same thing. -The car's driving along just fine, and at first you don't even notice that the engine has died. It's only when you wonder why you're slowing down and try the accelerator and nothing happens, that you peg the engine has died.
I also know that usually with the first engine stall, you can restart the car and keep driving for a while. Which is what we did. I'm happy to say we got to our final destination a half hour later with no further difficulties.
(With a dead injector it's the next day where you can't go any further. The car will start fine, but as soon as it's up to temperature, the slightest acceleration kills the engine.)

When we got in that night, I got this code: "0042FB DDE: Injectors, cyl 4, 5, 6, activation" which odometer wise related to the moment we stalled. The next day I pulled the intake manifold and checked the ohm resistance on every injector. They were all fine (180k Omhs +/- 5k) except for cylinder 5 which was like 25k Ohms.

I'm really glad I caught that behaviour in Inpa, I'm going to try and see if it's something I can access through a PID on Torque Pro with my phone and an ELM327 adaptor.

-Simeon
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  #2  
Old 04-13-2019, 01:36 AM
ard ard is offline
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Talk about serendipity!


I mean who lets the wife drive so they can peruse engine stuff WHILE on vacation?!?


Seriously though. talk about chance...



Thanks for posting it. Update once you get it fixed.
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Old 04-13-2019, 02:18 AM
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Join Date: May 2010
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I wanted to add a few notes about 2nd hand injectors and no urgent need to code them:

After buying the first two injectors brand new, this time I bought a 2nd hand one. They're really expensive new! And before you start thinking, 'Gees, if he's replaced three already - isn't that an argument for doing all 6, and brand new?!'
Well... no. I don't believe these injectors go bad on their own. Outside forces, mainly moisture, is what kills them.

The first injector I replaced, around a year ago, was the well known and classic Cylinder 5. There's much already written about this. Basically a design flaw causes moisture to get to the top of that injector and over the years corrosion slowly sets in and causes the injector to die.
The 2nd and 3rd injector failures I'm sad to say were pretty much my own fault. About 6 months ago I had to replace my DPF, and because of issues with the replacement (Check out some of my other youtube videos) the car was up on stands and in pieces for about two weeks. In that time, whilst I thought I had properly covered the engine - I hadn't and there was water sitting in injectors 5 and 6 at the back of the engine. They would have been in the water for a week. They both measured around 175k, I thought I'd be okay, but I was wrong. Injector 6 died two months later. And the brand new injector 5 died a few months later, now on our trip. (At the time I replaced 6, injector 5 was measuring around 167k Ohms.)

I started looking for the best price I could find for an injector. Having spent over $800 on the first two, I wasn't keen to keep spending more on the third. So I was interested when I found a local wrecker selling 2nd hand ones on Ebay. It's funny, when I turned up at the place asking for the injector, he said give him 5 mins and he'd go pull it from the engine he had. I asked him if it could be one of the front ones, 1, 2, or 3, away from the back of the engine. He gave me a knowing look and asked if it was Cylinder 5 I'm replacing. (Which it was, but not for the reason he was thinking.) I tested its resistance before handing over the cash.

As far as I know injectors 1-4 are all original and working fine. Sure there's always a small risk, but getting a 2nd hand injector should be no worst or better than what I've already got in there.

Regarding the coding. There's people who say you don't need to code replacement injectors, others who swear you do. -From my experience, you don't need to worry about it, the engine adapts anyway.
The coding is to better inform engine management of the injectors response behaviour, so that the computer can more precisely control the fuel delivery. I had coded my first two new injectors. But didn't see the point in doing it this time around as the 2nd hand injector couldn't possibly still match its listed values. I checked the 'selective mass adjustments' after the replacement. On the first drive that injector was a bit all over the place, and I was worried that I had bought a dud. However over the next few days it got better and better and two days later it's indistinguishable from the other injectors. Case in point - the engine will adapt.

-Simeon
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Old 04-13-2019, 02:22 AM
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I know. You're spot on.

It's been about a month now since I replaced the injector. Keeping an eye on it with Inpa. Has been absolutely fine so far.

I hope to try and find a way to monitor the 'selective mass adjustments' with an ELM327 OBD2 adaptor. So much quicker, easier, (and more likely that I'll do it regularly) than using the laptop and cable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ard View Post
Talk about serendipity!


I mean who lets the wife drive so they can peruse engine stuff WHILE on vacation?!?


Seriously though. talk about chance...



Thanks for posting it. Update once you get it fixed.
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