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-   -   X won't idel after replacing valve stem seals - receiving misfire codes. (https://xoutpost.com/bmw-sav-forums/x5-e53-forum/110360-x-wont-idel-after-replacing-valve-stem-seals-receiving-misfire-codes.html)

X5only 06-10-2019 04:16 PM

Congratulations! Phew, what a happy ending:thumbup:. Must be the best running N62 engine out there :D Mistakes happen even with the best. I've heard of one of the best and most experienced chief confess to cracking the egg, throw the yolk into the trash and place the shell into the frying pan!

Enjoy your vehicle and drive like it's meant to be. The missus gotta love your adventures :bustingup

andrewwynn 06-10-2019 05:36 PM

The more important lesson is perseverance paid off. You did kind of a worst case external scenario and it was the best worst case. More people will have similar oops unrelated to this job that will keep them encouraged.


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X5M-ISH 06-11-2019 10:39 AM

Nice, nice. So you have driven your truck by now? Anymore smokey puff of shame?

crystalworks 06-11-2019 11:49 AM

Congratulations!!! Was starting to have second thoughts about doing mine after your problems. You were so methodical/cautious and still had issues... was unnerving. But glad you are set and good to go now. :thumbup:

:bow::bow::bow::bow:

Purplefade 06-11-2019 02:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by X5M-ISH (Post 1164014)
Nice, nice. So you have driven your truck by now? Anymore smokey puff of shame?



Oh yes, picked her up last night and took her out for about an hours drive or so just to let things seat back in from being offline for so long.

After that I treated her to a bath and interior cleaning to get the shop funk off [emoji16]

And yes, I am happy to report that after a nice 20 minute idle, there is no smoke! To follow that up I started it and let it idle in the garage for about 20 minutes this morning before backing out for work and again, happily, no smoke!

(Note - mine only took about 5 or 6 minutes before it started sending up smoke signals, it was terrible, sitting through any type of drive through was enough to make me want to start wearing a bag over my head...)

Purplefade 06-11-2019 03:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crystalworks (Post 1164020)
Congratulations!!! Was starting to have second thoughts about doing mine after your problems. You were so methodical/cautious and still had issues... was unnerving. But glad you are set and good to go now. :thumbup:



:bow::bow::bow::bow:



Thanks CW!

Nah, don’t sweat it, you can definitely knock it out yourself if you’re comfortable under the hood - and I know you are [emoji106]

Not to mention you’ve got the entire forum behind you.

Make life easy for yourself. I used a 4 shelf garage shelving unit and labeled the top shelf “driver”, second shelf “passenger”, third shelf “intake and misc” and put the big parts on the bottom shelf.

I then made some quick labels for CPS upper, CPS lower, Vanos in, Vanos ex, etc, etc and as I removed pieces parts I laid them by their respective label. I also didn’t throw away ANY of the old pieces parts until I was ready to put that respective piece back on the car - Example I left the o-rings on the Vanos solenoids until I picked them up to put them back in, then I caned the old ones and put the new ones on. Did the same for my VC bolts, CPS o-rings, eccentric shaft sensor gaskets, etc.

Biggest concern I had, believe it or not, were the brackets on the timing covers and alternator and how they went on their respective components, take a decent picture of those and you’ll be solid!

Oh... and snap a pic of those Vanos plugs too [emoji12]

Purplefade 06-11-2019 03:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by andrewwynn (Post 1163970)
The more important lesson is perseverance paid off. You did kind of a worst case external scenario and it was the best worst case. More people will have similar oops unrelated to this job that will keep them encouraged.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro



It also gave me a huge amount of data that I was able to provide to my Indy which saved him a ton of time and me a ton of money [emoji106]

oldskewel 06-11-2019 03:12 PM

Nice work. I have a different engine (M54), but was following on hoping for a good outcome. Glad you got there. :thumbup:

As far as I know, there are not many plugs on these cars that can be mistakenly interchanged like that. O2 sensors are another one, so I labeled those carefully when taking things apart for the engine work last summer.

But for all the ~dozen or so connections in and around the intake manifold, not only is the cable length and bend a good clue, but the connectors themselves are keyed, so for example you don't actually need to worry about mixing up two nearby 2P plugs.

The keys in the connector will prevent that. I know you know that, but for others following at home wondering how hard it should be to take everything apart and put it back together, there is some perhaps non-obvious protection built in against problems.

So it's probably an easy mistake to make, since keeping absolute track of connectors is not usually necessary. Nice PSA for everyone that this is something to watch out for - just like the O2 sensor connections.

Purplefade 06-11-2019 07:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oldskewel (Post 1164030)
Nice work. I have a different engine (M54), but was following on hoping for a good outcome. Glad you got there. :thumbup:

As far as I know, there are not many plugs on these cars that can be mistakenly interchanged like that. O2 sensors are another one, so I labeled those carefully when taking things apart for the engine work last summer.

But for all the ~dozen or so connections in and around the intake manifold, not only is the cable length and bend a good clue, but the connectors themselves are keyed, so for example you don't actually need to worry about mixing up two nearby 2P plugs.

The keys in the connector will prevent that. I know you know that, but for others following at home wondering how hard it should be to take everything apart and put it back together, there is some perhaps non-obvious protection built in against problems.

So it's probably an easy mistake to make, since keeping absolute track of connectors is not usually necessary. Nice PSA for everyone that this is something to watch out for - just like the O2 sensor connections.






Thanks oldskewel :thumbup:



Is strange that they keyed nearly everything except the vanos, cps and O2 sensors, hmm, wonder if it was because there are 4 of each and they thought they'd really screw with us good when we finally needed to service those items... :confused:

Purplefade 06-11-2019 07:26 PM

Doing a brain dump for myself while everything is still clear in my head, I figure I might close this thread out with the consolidated detail of the issues I experienced, the process that I followed and pass along any dumb luck knowledge that I may have picked up along the way.


Thoughts?
Suggestions?




1) Setup space to put items that you remove from the car (I used a 4 shelf plastic storage shelf that was 48” wide x 20” deep and 60” tall with the top shelf labeled “Driver”, the 2nd shelf labeled “Passenger”, the 3rd shelf labeled “MISC” and the bottom shelf labeled “Intake & Assc”
2) Setup space close to the car for your tools, optimally you want everything that you will need for the job within arm’s reach (You will be swapping tools a bunch, allen to hex, to socket, extensions, etc, etc)
3) Let car sit a few days to bleed down fuel pressure (or be ready to be sprayed)
4) Disconnect the battery
a. Remove the hatch floor
b. Remove the spare tire
c. IF YOU HAVE AIR SUSPINSION – remove the 4, 10mm nuts and washer that hold down the compressor and push this off to the side (BE CAREFUL of your plastic air lines when you do this, make sure they are not in a bind or otherwise compromised)
5) Remove hood
6) Remove the air intake path
a. remove the air filter box cover, maf and elbow going to the intake (you'll need a nut driver to loosen the clip on the throttle body)
b. remove the 10mm bolt holding down the air box and the 4 plastic push clips holding down the air intake directly on top of the radiator and remove the air box and intake
7) Remove the electric fan
a. using a flat head screw driver push down on the clips holding the fan to the radiator and push then towards the engine (this will free up the fan so that it can be pulled up from the radiator)
b. unplug the large power connection going to the fan directly under the top radiator hose
c. unplug the small power connection going to the impact sensor on the top center of the fan (there are three zip ties holing that wiring in place, 2 on top the fan housing and one on the side, make sure to clip all three before pulling the fan out)
d. pull the hoses out of the hose retainers on the front of the fan (one on each side about mid ways down holding the cross over hose and power steering line and three across the bottom holding the lower cross over hose
e. BE CAREFUL removing the fan as the hose holders get snagged on everything and will either break the hose holder or the item its snagged on – Push the fan slightly away from the radiator and pull straight up on it and set it out of your way. BE CAREFUL of the ears on the plastic radiator retainers, left and right the right one will get hung up on the fan as will the small coolant hose going in to the top of the expansion tank... you'll know what I'm talking about when you get there, watch those.
8) Remove the cabin filter and air box compartment to access the rear valves
a. Loosen the twist lock clips holding the cover down on the cabin filter compartment and remove the cover
b. Disconnect the positive batter lead from the “copper jumper lug” under the plastic cover and move it out of the way (the battery should already be disconnected so no worries of shorting out)
c. Remove the two 13mm nuts holding the air box in place (one will be a single 13mm nut (pass side assuming LHD) and the other side will be a 13mm nut and plastic holder (driver side assuming LHD) for the batter positive cable)
d. Remove the weather stripping that is attached to the air box (it is simple pull off press on, easy to remove and put back)
e. Remove the “air horns” on either end of the cabin filter compartment
i. Lift straight up on each outer edge of the cabin filter compartment ends and the edge triangle shaped air horn piece will unseat and pull straight up, remove both of those
f. Pull slightly up and straight out on the air box and set it out of your way (it is a wee bit heavy and awkward, for hands wouldn’t hurt here)
9)

Once the hood, air intake path, fan and air box are out of your way you’ll want to work your way front to back down each bank of the engine.

Bank 1
10) Empty and remove the windshield washer fluid container
a. Unplug the washer pumps, you will either have two or three depending on if you have the headlight washers or not.
b. IF YOU HAVE HEADLIGHT WASHERS – remove the clamp holding the high pressure line on the headlight washer pump (largest of the three pumps, on the engine side of the reservoir) and pull that line loose from the pump (NOTE – you will need a small hose clamp to replace this factory clamp with)
c. Remove the two 10mm plastic nuts holding the washer fluid tank on (One is against the fender side and one is against the “firewall” side
d. GENTLY lift up on the washer fluid tank about 5 inches looking for the wire harness and water lines coming from the two remaining pumps on the back of the reservoir, gently pull those off and lift the washer fluid tank clear
11)


BRAIN DUMP:
Short and long cap nuts on the VCs are 10NM (8 each side)
Long bolts on the VCs are 15NM (5 each side)
Ground strap bolts in VCs are 6NM (2 each side)
Valvetronic mount and motor are 6NM (4 each side)


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