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Old 05-21-2019, 08:19 PM
X5M-ISH X5M-ISH is offline
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Join Date: May 2019
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From an analytical point of view, a copper wire will become hot based off of several factors:
*the gauge of the copper wire is insufficient for the amount of amps traveling through it
*the length of the copper wire is insufficient for the amount of amps traveling through it
*poorly mated terminal and/or corrosion at the terminal
*poor battery ground or chassis ground or oxidization at the contact point(s)
*heat soak by virtue of the engine running and the close proximity of this positive lead in the engine bay

It doesn’t matter the case, but electrons hate traveling when hot. Heat in and of its self can increase resistance in copper wire...which makes more heat...which increases resistance. If the flow of electrons is great enough, the copper will generate enough heat to melt the protective covering of the wire or wherever the electrons have found for their path of least resistance (like a connector or terminal). I would suggest checking your battery terminals for a solid connection, check your grounds for a solid connection and no oxidization as well as check the integrity of the positive jumper lead for any damage to the plastic sheathing.

Of course if this is a commonly known thing for the e53, someone will jump in and comment soon enough.

Last edited by X5M-ISH; 05-21-2019 at 10:41 PM.
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