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-   -   DIY Spark Plug Replacement - E70 3.0si (https://xoutpost.com/bmw-sav-forums/x5-e70-forum/91510-diy-spark-plug-replacement-e70-3-0si.html)

balx5 02-25-2013 02:09 AM

DIY Spark Plug Replacement - E70 3.0si
 
Here is my contribution to Outpost as I couldn't find one out there for the E70.

Spark Plug Replacement DIY

Vehicle Info:
2007 BMW E70 X5 3.0si

Tools/Materials needed:
Spark Plug Socket - 5/8
An extension set with multiple length. This is very useful
6 Spark Plugs (for 3.0si) – NGK (1208) ILZFR6D11 Laser Iridium
Anti-seize compound
Large and small flat head screwdriver
Mini ratcheting wrench
Hex bit 3/16 size or Allen wrench

http://www.xoutpost.com/picture.php?...pictureid=2060

http://www.xoutpost.com/picture.php?...pictureid=2064

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Step 1: Start by removing the center engine cover by unscrewing 4 hex bolts using a ratcheting wrench. The furthest inside hex bolts was the most difficult one to access as there is virtually no room on the 3.0. I had to remove the clip that was holding a pair of wires to gain access for a small ratcheting wrench. See pic below. Once they’re loose, lift the cover up and away.

http://www.xoutpost.com/picture.php?...pictureid=2061

Step 2: Remove the ignition coils. With a small flathead screwdriver gently pry the top of the ignition coil release latch. This will unlock the connector and then disconnect the wiring from the ignition coil. Next you can wiggle out the coil or used a long flat head screwdriver to lift the coil out.

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Step 3: Using a spark plug socket and a 6” inch extension, Place it down into the hole where the coil came out of. Twist it until you can press it down on the spark plug. You will hear a pop/click. You can now loosen the spark plug.

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Step 4: Get the new plugs and apply an anti-seize compound around the threaded area to avoid seize and corrosion.

Step 5: Place the new spark plug inside the socket and place it down the hole. Firmly press the coil back onto the plug, and then re-attach the connector. Lock it by pushing the black top down. *Make sure you make sure the ignition coil is seated firmly back into its slot. Do the same steps for the rest of the spark plugs and coils.

IMPORTANT: Please torque to specs and refer to any legitimate source for info.

Step 6: Finally, re-install everything in reverse order. Wipe the engine down with a rag and some degreaser while you have the cover off. Start engine and make sure it works.

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Disclaimer:
I am not responsible or liable for any damage of any property or injury resulted in performing this DIY. It is highly recommended to implement safety procedures at all times.

JCL 02-25-2013 02:26 AM

Suggest you take out the reference to installing anti-seize on the plugs. Not recommended.

Also suggest using a torque wrench for proper torque spec.

Quicksilver 02-26-2013 06:30 PM

What is the proper torque spec? Is there a difference for a 6 versus an 8 cylinder?

Quote:

Originally Posted by JCL (Post 924089)
Suggest you take out the reference to installing anti-seize on the plugs. Not recommended.

Also suggest using a torque wrench for proper torque spec.


lordshin808 03-08-2013 04:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JCL (Post 924089)
Suggest you take out the reference to installing anti-seize on the plugs. Not recommended.

Also suggest using a torque wrench for proper torque spec.

Why is applying anti-seize on the plugs NOT recommended? I thought the you're suppose to apply it so the plugs don't get stuck in there.

JCL 03-08-2013 04:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Quicksilver (Post 924457)
What is the proper torque spec? Is there a difference for a 6 versus an 8 cylinder?

I don't have it handy.

It will be specific to the spark plug size, not the engine. It will also vary with whether the plugs are dry (as they are supposed to be) or lubed.

JCL 03-08-2013 05:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lordshin808 (Post 925990)
Why is applying anti-seize on the plugs NOT recommended? I thought the you're suppose to apply it so the plugs don't get stuck in there.

1) Too much gets on the electrode.
2) The effective heat range of the plug can be affected by the conductivity of the paste (plug to block)
3) The plugs already have an anti-seize coating. If it is a very old plug (black, no silver threads, no label indicating anti-seize) then this doesn't apply.
4) Anti-seize changes the effective torque spec. Lubricated threads reduce the friction, so the plugs go in further (against the crush washer) up to when you hit the torque spec. That means they sit lower, and the exposed end can get deposit buildup. That is what can cause seized plugs. If using a lubricant/anti-seize paste, then reduce the torque spec. There is a reason that all the torque specs are usually dry specs, though. BMW, most automakers, all the major plug manufacturers, all recommend not to use anything on the threads. Lots of home mechanics (and some professional mechanics) think they know better, though.

I leave them dry, I don't overtighten them, and I don't get seized plugs.

lordshin808 03-08-2013 05:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JCL (Post 925992)
1) Too much gets on the electrode.
2) The effective heat range of the plug can be affected by the conductivity of the paste (plug to block)
3) The plugs already have an anti-seize coating. If it is a very old plug (black, no silver threads, no label indicating anti-seize) then this doesn't apply.
4) Anti-seize changes the effective torque spec. Lubricated threads reduce the friction, so the plugs go in further (against the crush washer) up to when you hit the torque spec. That means they sit lower, and the exposed end can get deposit buildup. That is what can cause seized plugs. If using a lubricant/anti-seize paste, then reduce the torque spec. There is a reason that all the torque specs are usually dry specs, though. BMW, most automakers, all the major plug manufacturers, all recommend not to use anything on the threads. Lots of home mechanics (and some professional mechanics) think they know better, though.

I leave them dry, I don't overtighten them, and I don't get seized plugs.

makes sense. thanks for your info on the forum. :thumbup:

jeep 04-26-2013 02:29 PM

I was looking for the "valve cover gasket replacement DIY" when I saw your post, thanks for sharing. Looks like there is some oil leaking from your valve cover gasket as well. Frankly I am not happy that the valve cover gasket starts leaking so soon, I have just 44K miles on mine and it's an 08. Looking at the involved process and tools required I might just let the Indy do it for me, and probably will get the plugs replaced at the same time.

Are you planning on replacing your valve cover gasket? Did you get any quotes for the same and if you do replace it yourself will appreciate if you can post a DIY for the same as well.

Thx

balx5 04-26-2013 03:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jeep (Post 934333)
I was looking for the "valve cover gasket replacement DIY" when I saw your post, thanks for sharing. Looks like there is some oil leaking from your valve cover gasket as well. Frankly I am not happy that the valve cover gasket starts leaking so soon, I have just 44K miles on mine and it's an 08. Looking at the involved process and tools required I might just let the Indy do it for me, and probably will get the plugs replaced at the same time.

Are you planning on replacing your valve cover gasket? Did you get any quotes for the same and if you do replace it yourself will appreciate if you can post a DIY for the same as well.

Thx

Funny you mentioned as its at the dealer today under CPO for the gasket work. Sorry no DIY for this.

Update: Got the X back and they replaced 3 gaskets. Guess it was leaking in a few places...CPO'd

11-12-7-582-245 - Profile- gasket
11-12-7-559-699 - Gasket Cylinder head
11-12-7-552-280 - Gasket -Cylinder head, electr. add-on parts

Jarola 05-25-2013 11:33 AM

Step 1: Start by removing the center engine cover by unscrewing 4 hex bolts using a ratcheting wrench. The furthest inside hex bolts was the most difficult one to access as there is virtually no room on the 3.0. I had to remove the clip that was holding a pair of wires to gain access for a small ratcheting wrench.

How did you remove the clip for the pair or wires? I cant seem to figure it out.

Thanks!


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