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  #71  
Old 01-03-2017, 03:00 PM
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Outstanding Beast Mode finale Danny!

Quick question, with the engine all that far opened up, what would you think of pulling the heads off and doing a valve job on the heads if someone were all that far in?

When I get up around 150K, I'm going to be in touch with you. With a head job and all the chains and guides done, you've got what we call in the piston aircraft world, a complete "Top" overhaul.

Once an engine was done like you've done it, I could see it delivering another 100K miles assuming the bottom end bearings were treated to nice oils.

Mike
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  #72  
Old 01-03-2017, 04:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by semcoinc View Post
Outstanding Beast Mode finale Danny!

Quick question, with the engine all that far opened up, what would you think of pulling the heads off and doing a valve job on the heads if someone were all that far in?

When I get up around 150K, I'm going to be in touch with you. With a head job and all the chains and guides done, you've got what we call in the piston aircraft world, a complete "Top" overhaul.

Once an engine was done like you've done it, I could see it delivering another 100K miles assuming the bottom end bearings were treated to nice oils.

Mike
In theory it wouldn't be all that much more work to pull the heads off, since you need to remove all the timing components anyways. That being said, if I were removing the heads I would just do this whole rebuild as an engine-out job. Doing a head job with the engine still in the X5 would be miserable, there's hardly any room on the sides of the engine.

I personally didn't see a reason to do a valve job— the engine never really went out of time so the pistons and valves never met. Thankfully the dealer that was selling it at the time stopped driving it completely once the guides went.

Yeah, I don't foresee anything going wrong for the next 100k miles, aside from the usual stuff (alternator/water pump/pulleys/ignition coils). I don't think there are any issues with the rod bearings, given that it's still a pretty low-revving engine that uses regular oil, versus a high-revving exotic oil-using engine like an S54. I'll send off an oil sample for analysis when I do my next oil change, just to see how everything is.
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  #73  
Old 01-03-2017, 04:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dannyzabolotny View Post
In theory it wouldn't be all that much more work to pull the heads off, since you need to remove all the timing components anyways. That being said, if I were removing the heads I would just do this whole rebuild as an engine-out job. Doing a head job with the engine still in the X5 would be miserable, there's hardly any room on the sides of the engine.

I personally didn't see a reason to do a valve job— the engine never really went out of time so the pistons and valves never met. Thankfully the dealer that was selling it at the time stopped driving it completely once the guides went.

Yeah, I don't foresee anything going wrong for the next 100k miles, aside from the usual stuff (alternator/water pump/pulleys/ignition coils). I don't think there are any issues with the rod bearings, given that it's still a pretty low-revving engine that uses regular oil, versus a high-revving exotic oil-using engine like an S54. I'll send off an oil sample for analysis when I do my next oil change, just to see how everything is.
There would really be no reason to pull the head on the 4.6is engine. The only thing that goes that needs attention on these is timing chain, guides, tensioners and vanos. These engines are pretty much bullet proof once the attention is is given to the aforementioned items.

Last edited by X53Jay4.8is; 01-03-2017 at 06:54 PM.
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  #74  
Old 01-03-2017, 05:12 PM
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Great progress Danny, this thing will be back on the road shortly and better than ever. I'll ship you my 4.6 if it ever needs guides done LOL!
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  #75  
Old 01-04-2017, 03:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CleanIsFast View Post
Great progress Danny, this thing will be back on the road shortly and better than ever. I'll ship you my 4.6 if it ever needs guides done LOL!
Thanks! The chain guide job really isn't hard to do, it's just really time consuming.

-------

Anyways, onto the conclusion of the guide story. After the engine was timed, I jacked up the X5 and proceeded to install the newly cleaned oil pan with a new gasket. Brake cleaner can work miracles, even on grubby old oil pans.



I installed the oil pan, torqued the bolts, torqued the drain plug, and reconnected the oil level sensor. While I was under the X5 I decided to take care of everything else under there, so I installed the power steering pump and the reinforcement plate. I reused the reinforcement plate bolts because they looked fine to me.

Once I was done with everything underneath, I moved on to installing the upper timing covers. I used a zip tie to keep the tensioner rail tensioned once the tensioner tool was removed. This isn't 100% necessary, but I like to do it just to make sure the chain never has too much slack which could potentially mess up the timing.



Initially I installed the upper timing covers quite loosely, since they need to be pressed into position to seat properly. I used a trick I learned from Beisan Systems, which was to use double the washers on four of the valve cover nuts, so that I could use the valve cover (without the gasket) to physically clamp down on the timing cover.



Check out that rad powder coated finish on the valve cover. It's two-toned and quite textured, which helps to hide the flaws that the valve covers had after 213k miles. I got it done at a local powder coating shop, it was around $80 for the pair. They were baked to get the oil residue out, sandblasted to remove the old finish, powder coated, and then baked to cure the finish.



After the upper timing covers were torqued down, I installed the Vanos solenoids along with their new gaskets. On the passenger side I also installed a new timing chain tensioner. I saved the old one to take a comparison picture to show the difference in tensioner designs over the years.



The old one wasn't that worn, the old spring was just shorter. Later on, BMW redesigned the tensioner spring so that there would be more tension on the timing chain upon cold startups, thus minimizing the startup rattle.

With the upper timing covers fully installed, I replaced the valley pan gasket. The coolant in the valley pan looked pretty clean— there wasn't any real cross-contamination going on, which was a good sign. I cleaned up around it a little bit but I didn't go crazy since that part of the engine isn't visible at all in most situations. I was thrilled to see proper blue BMW coolant used everywhere.







I was able to reuse the plastic cover after cleaning it a bit, which was nice because of how ridiculously expensive a new one is. The old valley pan gasket piece had a 2010 production date so it held up for 6-7 years, not too bad at all.

With the valley pan all sorted out, I installed the water pump and the water pipes, using new o-rings lubricated with silicone grease. The water pump was pretty recent and had a metal impeller so I elected to reuse it. I also installed the alternator, which was probably the easiest part of this whole job. After that I installed the crank pulley/harmonic balancer. You always want to install it after the water pump because it blocks access to one of the water pump bolts.



Finally, it was time to install the beautifully refinished valve covers. Everything went on quite easily with no issues.



I stopped there because of the holidays. On January 2nd I was finally able to resume the work. I installed the intake manifold, and no joke, that was possibly the worst part of this entire job. I had to remove a rotten OSV hose that was super hard to access, and then I had to install a new OSV hose there. Even with the cabin air filter housing removed there was almost no room to maneuver. I also had to pretty much crouch on top of the engine with my knees on the valve covers, now that got painful pretty quickly. Here's the area I'm referring to:



I ended up bending the pipe a little bit so that I could access it better. Once the new hose was installed I bent it back into place. After that hellish experience, the rest of the intake manifold installation was a downright breeze. I used new intake manifold gaskets as well. Once the manifold was installed, I connected the dozen hoses going to it, as well as the fuel supply.



After that, I installed the secondary air pipe and the electrical boxes, along with all the electrical connections to the various parts of the engine.



At this point was like 3:30am so I just kinda blacked out for the rest of the steps. When I snapped out of my stupor I had installed pretty much everything else...



Ignition coils, new NGK Iridium spark plugs, cabin air filter housing, air intake, MAF boot, expansion tank, all the cooling hoses, the fan shroud, the fan clutch, the battery terminal, and all the vacuum lines. Nothing terribly exciting there. I then added a whole bunch of coolant and bled the system a bit. I also added in about 8.5 quarts of Mobil 1 0W40, which is my preferred oil for these M62tu engines. I had also hooked up the battery and the battery charger at some point, just to make sure the battery wasn't dead.

Then came the fateful first start. Even though this is my 7th M62tu rebuild, I was still just as nervous as ever when I turned that key. I let the fuel pump prime a few times and then I started the engine. It made quite a clatter initially and quickly settled into a rough idle. It almost died a few times and ran a bit rough while the DME was trying to figure out the whole fuel/air supply thing, but that's pretty normal if you remove the intake manifold and disconnect the fuel lines. After about 30 seconds the engine settled into a happy idle, with just a hint of lifter tick from sitting dry for a month.

After letting it run for a few minutes, I shut it down and went to double check my work under the hood. The expansion tank was nearly empty, so I added more coolant to compensate. The oil level was a tad low as well, so I topped it off. I noticed a sizable coolant leak which was quickly determined to be coming from an improperly installed upper radiator hose. That was a quick and easy fix, and is proof of why you shouldn't do this stuff at 5am after almost 24 hours of no sleep.

Once the fluids were topped off, I double checked the tire pressures and rolled the X5 out of the garage to go for a test drive. Since the gas tank was nearly empty, the test drive was to the closest gas station. It made it there without any issues. I put $60 of premium Chevron gas into the X5— the pump showed 22.7 gallons, so the gas tank was really close to empty. While I was gassing up, I took some pictures of the newly resurrected X5.









This is why I do what I do. No words can describe the immense satisfaction and pride I feel when I start up a freshly rebuilt engine successfully. There's just nothing like it. There were no check engine lights, no error lights of any kind, and the coolant temperatures were stable.

I actually took videos of the entire first startup and first test drive, so once I get those edited together I'll link them here.

I drove the X5 to work yesterday with no problems whatsoever. Drove it to work today as well, so far so good. I've put almost 100 miles on it in like a day, that's how excited I am about it.
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  #76  
Old 01-04-2017, 03:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dannyzabolotny View Post
Thanks! The chain guide job really isn't hard to do, it's just really time consuming.

-------

Anyways, onto the conclusion of the guide story. After the engine was timed, I jacked up the X5 and proceeded to install the newly cleaned oil pan with a new gasket. Brake cleaner can work miracles, even on grubby old oil pans.



I installed the oil pan, torqued the bolts, torqued the drain plug, and reconnected the oil level sensor. While I was under the X5 I decided to take care of everything else under there, so I installed the power steering pump and the reinforcement plate. I reused the reinforcement plate bolts because they looked fine to me.

Once I was done with everything underneath, I moved on to installing the upper timing covers. I used a zip tie to keep the tensioner rail tensioned once the tensioner tool was removed. This isn't 100% necessary, but I like to do it just to make sure the chain never has too much slack which could potentially mess up the timing.



Initially I installed the upper timing covers quite loosely, since they need to be pressed into position to seat properly. I used a trick I learned from Beisan Systems, which was to use double the washers on four of the valve cover nuts, so that I could use the valve cover (without the gasket) to physically clamp down on the timing cover.



Check out that rad powder coated finish on the valve cover. It's two-toned and quite textured, which helps to hide the flaws that the valve covers had after 213k miles. I got it done at a local powder coating shop, it was around $80 for the pair. They were baked to get the oil residue out, sandblasted to remove the old finish, powder coated, and then baked to cure the finish.



After the upper timing covers were torqued down, I installed the Vanos solenoids along with their new gaskets. On the passenger side I also installed a new timing chain tensioner. I saved the old one to take a comparison picture to show the difference in tensioner designs over the years.



The old one wasn't that worn, the old spring was just shorter. Later on, BMW redesigned the tensioner spring so that there would be more tension on the timing chain upon cold startups, thus minimizing the startup rattle.

With the upper timing covers fully installed, I replaced the valley pan gasket. The coolant in the valley pan looked pretty clean— there wasn't any real cross-contamination going on, which was a good sign. I cleaned up around it a little bit but I didn't go crazy since that part of the engine isn't visible at all in most situations. I was thrilled to see proper blue BMW coolant used everywhere.







I was able to reuse the plastic cover after cleaning it a bit, which was nice because of how ridiculously expensive a new one is. The old valley pan gasket piece had a 2010 production date so it held up for 6-7 years, not too bad at all.

With the valley pan all sorted out, I installed the water pump and the water pipes, using new o-rings lubricated with silicone grease. The water pump was pretty recent and had a metal impeller so I elected to reuse it. I also installed the alternator, which was probably the easiest part of this whole job. After that I installed the crank pulley/harmonic balancer. You always want to install it after the water pump because it blocks access to one of the water pump bolts.



Finally, it was time to install the beautifully refinished valve covers. Everything went on quite easily with no issues.



I stopped there because of the holidays. On January 2nd I was finally able to resume the work. I installed the intake manifold, and no joke, that was possibly the worst part of this entire job. I had to remove a rotten OSV hose that was super hard to access, and then I had to install a new OSV hose there. Even with the cabin air filter housing removed there was almost no room to maneuver. I also had to pretty much crouch on top of the engine with my knees on the valve covers, now that got painful pretty quickly. Here's the area I'm referring to:



I ended up bending the pipe a little bit so that I could access it better. Once the new hose was installed I bent it back into place. After that hellish experience, the rest of the intake manifold installation was a downright breeze. I used new intake manifold gaskets as well. Once the manifold was installed, I connected the dozen hoses going to it, as well as the fuel supply.



After that, I installed the secondary air pipe and the electrical boxes, along with all the electrical connections to the various parts of the engine.



At this point was like 3:30am so I just kinda blacked out for the rest of the steps. When I snapped out of my stupor I had installed pretty much everything else...



Ignition coils, new NGK Iridium spark plugs, cabin air filter housing, air intake, MAF boot, expansion tank, all the cooling hoses, the fan shroud, the fan clutch, the battery terminal, and all the vacuum lines. Nothing terribly exciting there. I then added a whole bunch of coolant and bled the system a bit. I also added in about 8.5 quarts of Mobil 1 0W40, which is my preferred oil for these M62tu engines. I had also hooked up the battery and the battery charger at some point, just to make sure the battery wasn't dead.

Then came the fateful first start. Even though this is my 7th M62tu rebuild, I was still just as nervous as ever when I turned that key. I let the fuel pump prime a few times and then I started the engine. It made quite a clatter initially and quickly settled into a rough idle. It almost died a few times and ran a bit rough while the DME was trying to figure out the whole fuel/air supply thing, but that's pretty normal if you remove the intake manifold and disconnect the fuel lines. After about 30 seconds the engine settled into a happy idle, with just a hint of lifter tick from sitting dry for a month.

After letting it run for a few minutes, I shut it down and went to double check my work under the hood. The expansion tank was nearly empty, so I added more coolant to compensate. The oil level was a tad low as well, so I topped it off. I noticed a sizable coolant leak which was quickly determined to be coming from an improperly installed upper radiator hose. That was a quick and easy fix, and is proof of why you shouldn't do this stuff at 5am after almost 24 hours of no sleep.

Once the fluids were topped off, I double checked the tire pressures and rolled the X5 out of the garage to go for a test drive. Since the gas tank was nearly empty, the test drive was to the closest gas station. It made it there without any issues. I put $60 of premium Chevron gas into the X5— the pump showed 22.7 gallons, so the gas tank was really close to empty. While I was gassing up, I took some pictures of the newly resurrected X5.









This is why I do what I do. No words can describe the immense satisfaction and pride I feel when I start up a freshly rebuilt engine successfully. There's just nothing like it. There were no check engine lights, no error lights of any kind, and the coolant temperatures were stable.

I actually took videos of the entire first startup and first test drive, so once I get those edited together I'll link them here.

I drove the X5 to work yesterday with no problems whatsoever. Drove it to work today as well, so far so good. I've put almost 100 miles on it in like a day, that's how excited I am about it.

Nice finish to the first chapter of this resurrection project. Congrats
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  #77  
Old 01-04-2017, 03:30 PM
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Hi Danny,

+1000 on the personal satisfaction one gets after a project like this and the continuing enjoyment of driving a machine in which one has so much blood, sweat and tears invested.

Likewise, the tenuous "Moment of Truth" when you turn the key after such a monster project and are nervous as heck! BTDT with some engine rebuilds years ago.

A phenomenally well documented accomplishment

Congrats!

Mike
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  #78  
Old 01-04-2017, 04:24 PM
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Nicely done.
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  #79  
Old 01-04-2017, 05:57 PM
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Thanks guys! I just passed through emissions and got a check engine light literally 10 minutes after I passed the test. It's hilarious because the exact same thing happened with the 2000 M5 I had. I checked the cause of the light and it was a P3157 which is a cylinder 8 misfire. That's the only code and I got a misfire on that same cylinder this morning, so I suspect that it's an ignition coil. About half of the ignition coils on this X5 are the cheap eBay kind, including the one on cylinder 8, so I'm going to swap in a known good OEM coil and see if that fixes the problem. My spark plugs are all brand new and torqued down to spec. The misfire is very occasional for now.

Last night I did a little bit of digging around and found a Dice Mediabridge with iPod connection and Sirius installed behind the kick panel on the driver's side of the center console. It had the old 30-pin iPod connector so after a quick run to the local Apple store I got a 30-pin to Lightning adapter which allowed me to use it with my iPhone. It's a bit of a quirky setup but having an aux-in that isn't a tape adapter is perfectly fine with me haha. I do think the front tweeters are blown though, no matter what I play through them (from any source) there's crackling and distortion in the high end, even at low volumes.

I also tidied up in the trunk because it was a nightmare before. This is how the trunk looked when I went to disconnect the battery before diving into the chain guide project:



No wonder there was stuff banging around when I drove the X5 yesterday... After locating the proper nuts/bolts which were scattered around the spare tire well, I installed everything properly. It looks much tidier and the compressor is no longer flopping around.



I love quick little fixes like that, they're just so satisfying!

Today I ordered a new air filter, new cabin air filter, window shade hooks (some of mine are broken), and an aluminum water pump pulley. The current engine air filter is one of those lame K&N oiled air filters (not a fan) and I have no idea when the cabin air filter was replaced, so it's worth replacing both. The window shade hooks were extremely reasonable in price— they were a bit under $4 for a 4-pack of Genuine BMW hooks. I was honestly expecting them to be like $30. The water pump pulley is mostly intact for now, but when I was reassembling everything I saw that it was starting to chip away a bit so I figured I'd replace it with a sturdier aluminum one.





I'm not a big fan of those kidney grilles with the painted silver slats, they look like they're trying to imitate the facelift style. Eventually I'll get some all-black grilles from ECS Tuning. I also find it hilarious how my co-worker's new Challenger on the right has angel eyes but my BMW X5 doesn't... for now, at least.
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  #80  
Old 01-04-2017, 06:23 PM
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Well done! Extremely well documented.
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