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  #11  
Old 04-02-2014, 10:36 AM
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Thanks RajB - I actually stumbled across this information in your original thread and it was helpful. I had another go at it last night (day 3) but this time with pressurizing the reservoir - that seems to be key.

After doing so a lot of air came out of the system, particularly at the pass/rear bleeder. It is better now; which is to say I have resistance/fairly firm pedal with the key off; but with the engine running it is still going pretty much to to floor. So while terrible, it is an improvement over day 2.

I am going to repeat the process again this evening hopefully, and maybe it will improve again after making another. It is interesting that I don't think I have seen any air from the fronts, it does seem as though it is the rears that are the issue.

What is the device on the floor? Seems awful robust for a mere catch can...?

---

Aha, got it:

http://www.liquid-levers.com/shop/pr...79ee83f1f1f157

___

Thanks!

Last edited by Ashaman074; 04-02-2014 at 10:43 AM.
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  #12  
Old 04-02-2014, 10:39 AM
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Oh yes, also - Do you remember why it states "A second person is necessary for this procedure?"

I am not sure what their role is. If the reservoir is pressurized, and the bleeder is opened, and the bleeding cycle started with the computer; it seems like a one man job?
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  #13  
Old 04-02-2014, 11:42 AM
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Here's what my Bentley manual has to say about brake bleeding. Seems as if your "helper" is required for some brake pedal duties.

I am researching this subject as well. I know mine hasn't been changed in the 3 years I've owned my X. Who knows when and if it was done before.





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  #14  
Old 04-02-2014, 11:46 AM
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On this topic. I guess a vacuum type bleeder is not the way to go? They want pressure. I wonder if it makes a big difference? Reason being - I
picked-up a vacuum-bleeder from harborfreight the other day...


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  #15  
Old 04-02-2014, 12:03 PM
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I recommend using a pressure pump, Il maybe add a brake bleeding/fluid replacement to my list of DIYs for those who want to do it but dont have the specialty tools.
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  #16  
Old 04-02-2014, 12:39 PM
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Glad the info is helpful.

Yes it is a pressure system Jason is using and if using this sort of system then it is a one man job.

The reason, the fronts are fine is that the valves close to the rear when the fluid has drained out of the system so allowing the fronts to remain intact. Jason said you have to use the software (autologic etc) to open the valves back up to allow the fluid to fully pass through and allow the proper bleed of the system and fill the pipes back up and remove the air.

Just using the pressure system on it's own will not allow the system to still be bled.

We were at it for a couple of hours with loads of air coming out but still never got anywhere until Jason hooked up the Autologic to cycle the valves open.
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  #17  
Old 04-02-2014, 04:50 PM
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Garrett.fell; thanks for that information also. Right off the "holding the pedal to the floor" seems to answer my question and provide another step to try as I have not been doing that.

I have been allowing the pedal to return to its upright position, so it seems this is not the correct procedure.
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  #18  
Old 04-02-2014, 04:58 PM
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Hold on. Watch this. Do not hold brake pedal to floor.

3min mark, explains why.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=04DZuyzAQDQ
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  #19  
Old 04-04-2014, 10:29 AM
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I missed my next update, so I'll give a combined Day 4/5

Day 4 I was able to properly pressurize the reservoir. I performed a full bleed, at each point I pressurized the reservoir, opened the bleeder. Allows the attached hose to fully fill, submerged in a container of brake fluid. Pumped the brakes 5 times. Ran the DIS bleed procedure. Pumped the brake 5 times. Started the engine, pumped the brake 5 times. Ran the DIS bleed procedure. Closed the bleeder. Sounds ridiculous; but I got a TON of air out of the system, mainly at the passenger rear.

So, after this raindance, I had a fairly firm pedal with the engine off, but it was still soft with the engine running.

The next day after work, I basically repeated the exact same process. Afterwards, I had a pedal that was rock solid with engine off, and usable with the engine running. I still didn't think it was quite as good as before, but at least I could drive it and bed the pads in.

Today I drove it to work, and they feel great. Not sure why it is any different than last night, maybe the fluid was a bit aerated; but they are fantastic now.

I sometimes like to check it after driving a few days to ensure no additional air worked its way back out of the system, so I'll probably do that this time too - but for the time being I am just happy to lay it to rest - What a fiasco!

You can be darned sure I'll watch fluid levels like a hawk the next service; that is for sure!

But yeah, pressure bleeding running the "Bleed Procedure" routine were key. It was difficult enough and took enough time even with them, I don't think it ever would have been possible without them. I suppose this is pretty typical of any modern AWD vehicle, but it was a frustrating bit O' learning for sure. Thanks again to everyone who helped!
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  #20  
Old 04-04-2014, 10:30 AM
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I missed my next update, so I'll give a combined Day 4/5

Day 4 I was able to properly pressurize the reservoir. I performed a full bleed, at each point I pressurized the reservoir, opened the bleeder. Allowed the attached hose to fully fill, submerged in a container of brake fluid. Pumped the brakes 5 times. Ran the DIS bleed procedure. Pumped the brake 5 times. Started the engine, pumped the brake 5 times. Ran the DIS bleed procedure. Closed the bleeder. Sounds ridiculous; but I got a TON of air out of the system, mainly at the passenger rear.

So, after this raindance, I had a fairly firm pedal with the engine off, but it was still soft with the engine running.

The next day after work, I basically repeated the exact same process. Afterwards, I had a pedal that was rock solid with engine off, and usable with the engine running. I still didn't think it was quite as good as before, but at least I could drive it and bed the pads in.

Today I drove it to work, and they feel great. Not sure why it is any different than last night, maybe the fluid was a bit aerated; but they are fantastic now.

I sometimes like to check it after driving a few days to ensure no additional air worked its way back out of the system, so I'll probably do that this time too - but for the time being I am just happy to lay it to rest - What a fiasco!

You can be darned sure I'll watch fluid levels like a hawk the next service; that is for sure!

But yeah, pressure bleeding running the "Bleed Procedure" routine were key. It was difficult enough and took enough time even with them, I don't think it ever would have been possible without them. I suppose this is pretty typical of any modern AWD vehicle, but it was a frustrating bit O' learning for sure. Thanks again to everyone who helped!
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