Home Forums Articles How To's FAQ Register
Go Back   Xoutpost.com > BMW SAV Forums > X5 (E53) Forum
Arnott
User Name
Password
Member List Premier Membership Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Xoutpost server transfer and maintenance is occurring....
Xoutpost is currently undergoing a planned server migration.... stay tuned for new developments.... sincerely, the management


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #171  
Old 12-15-2016, 05:35 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Saskatchewan Canada
Posts: 882
80stech is on a distinguished road
The cold weather parts don't help that much in really cold weather. Moisture build-up freezes in the vacuum manifold instead of the CCV.
__________________
1988 325is (purchased new)
2004 X5 3.0 (new to me) 2005 X3 2.5 (new to wife)
Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links

  #172  
Old 12-15-2016, 05:41 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Saskatchewan Canada
Posts: 882
80stech is on a distinguished road
@bcredliner You do make a good point, it is a bit scary that most of the guys doing the mod don't really understand how either system works. Like I said earlier, in most cases there is a bit a luck/magic involved as well.
__________________
1988 325is (purchased new)
2004 X5 3.0 (new to me) 2005 X3 2.5 (new to wife)
Reply With Quote
  #173  
Old 12-15-2016, 05:53 PM
bcredliner's Avatar
.1 decrease 0-60 time = $1000 & DIY
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Little Elm,Texas. (40 minutes North of Dallas)
Posts: 6,963
bcredliner is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80stech View Post
@bcredliner You do make a good point, it is a bit scary that most of the guys doing the mod don't really understand how either system works. Like I said earlier, in most cases there is a bit a luck/magic involved as well.
It might be better, it's easy to innovate if you don't know it can't be done.
__________________
X5 4.6 2002 Black Sap, Black interior. 2013 X5M Melbourne Red, Bamboo interior
Dallas
Reply With Quote
  #174  
Old 12-15-2016, 06:03 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 836
lo_jack is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80stech View Post
@bcredliner You do make a good point, it is a bit scary that most of the guys doing the mod don't really understand how either system works. Like I said earlier, in most cases there is a bit a luck/magic involved as well.
That is why when I do something about this, I am going to replicate a different stock system. M56 SULEV. One hopes the engineers that deployed it knew the answers to those questions...because it did get approved and implemented. I'm just going to copy them.
__________________
2001 E53 3.0 5pd
Reply With Quote
  #175  
Old 12-15-2016, 06:41 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Saskatchewan Canada
Posts: 882
80stech is on a distinguished road
@lo-jack
It's best to inform yourself about how things work and know how you want to change them, not to try to copy. It might be the same engineers that designed the M54 CCCV ! What I am really curious about is why the crankcase needs to be completely closed in the first place? emmisions maybe ? to meet what spec? what is the reasoning ?
__________________
1988 325is (purchased new)
2004 X5 3.0 (new to me) 2005 X3 2.5 (new to wife)
Reply With Quote
  #176  
Old 12-15-2016, 07:07 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Virigina, USA
Posts: 2,074
StephenVA is on a distinguished road
From the "Way too much info Department"

Closed crankcase venting systems (CCV) are a US Federal emissions requirements from the 70's as part of the requirements to capture the evaporation (venting) emissions (began in the late 60's for CA vehicles). They require a manufacturer to reduce the output of engine combustion vapors, gas evaporation, etc. The test is a vehicle in a plastic bag. Every year this capture requirement level was raised throughout the 80-90's. Before then everything was vented to the ground. Welcome to US DOT emissions regulations, now Euro and hence worldwide. See India and South America for non compliance. Gee I wonder if those vehicles had a different system due to no country mandated regulations required?
Attached Images
File Type: pdf Evaporative_Emissions.pdf (285.3 KB, 189 views)
__________________

2005 X5 4.8IS
The Blue ones are always FASTER....

Current Garage:
2005 X5 4.8is
2002 M5 TiSilver
2003 525iT
1998 528i
Former Garage Stable Highlights
2004 325XiT Sport
1973 De Tomaso Pantera, L Model
1970 Dodge Challenger T/A 4 sp Alpine White
1970 Dodge Challenger T/A 4 sp GoManGo Green
1971 Dart Sport, “Dart Light” package
1969 Road Runner 383
1968 Ply Barracuda 340S FB Sea-foam Green

Last edited by StephenVA; 12-15-2016 at 07:16 PM. Reason: Found a technical article
Reply With Quote
  #177  
Old 12-15-2016, 07:13 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Saskatchewan Canada
Posts: 882
80stech is on a distinguished road
StepenVA, I think you mean "positive crankcase ventilation" PCV not CCV
__________________
1988 325is (purchased new)
2004 X5 3.0 (new to me) 2005 X3 2.5 (new to wife)
Reply With Quote
  #178  
Old 12-15-2016, 07:26 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Saskatchewan Canada
Posts: 882
80stech is on a distinguished road
I think the idea behind the CCV is to keep the recycled gases as inert as possible to reduce NOS emmisions similar to how an EGR works. Sucks for moisture though! ;( even a small amount of atmospere let in would allow the whole thing to work a lot better. I imagine the engineers where given zero tolerance though.
__________________
1988 325is (purchased new)
2004 X5 3.0 (new to me) 2005 X3 2.5 (new to wife)
Reply With Quote
  #179  
Old 12-15-2016, 07:36 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Virigina, USA
Posts: 2,074
StephenVA is on a distinguished road
A PCV is a part answer to the CCV challenge. In the US we just call them PCV systems as domestic manufactures use(d) a replaceable tube/vent/orifice that used to be a annual replacement item. In the '65 model year they were required. In 1968-70 days: intake tube in the air cleaner allows filtered air in, PCV tube vented fumes into the intake and hence into the combustion chambers. Way too uncontrolled for emissions now days. A few are still around in 2000's.
ALL the easy systems are long gone....
__________________

2005 X5 4.8IS
The Blue ones are always FASTER....

Current Garage:
2005 X5 4.8is
2002 M5 TiSilver
2003 525iT
1998 528i
Former Garage Stable Highlights
2004 325XiT Sport
1973 De Tomaso Pantera, L Model
1970 Dodge Challenger T/A 4 sp Alpine White
1970 Dodge Challenger T/A 4 sp GoManGo Green
1971 Dart Sport, “Dart Light” package
1969 Road Runner 383
1968 Ply Barracuda 340S FB Sea-foam Green
Reply With Quote
  #180  
Old 12-15-2016, 07:48 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Virigina, USA
Posts: 2,074
StephenVA is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80stech View Post
I think the idea behind the CCV is to keep the recycled gases as inert as possible to reduce NOS emmisions similar to how an EGR works. Sucks for moisture though! ;( even a small amount of atmospere let in would allow the whole thing to work a lot better. I imagine the engineers where given zero tolerance though.
NOX is a byproduct of combustion (air/fuel burn). The EGR was introduced to lower the temp and completeness of the burn as NOX increases as the flame wall travels to the very end of the chamber. So they introduced a part of non combustible mix to the intake side to solve that issue for 1972+. Worked OK until someone invented the ability to measure air/fuel ratios on the fly called an O2 sensor, which allows the ratio to be more controlled across the RPM/load ranges. We can and have kicked this one around way too long as it is off topic and is only interesting to SAE geeks.

We are stuck with what the engineers dreamed up and was Federalized for the US and Euro market. It works as designed. We are the last owners (most of us) so we have to suck it up and replace/clean and keep a watchful eye out for what is mostly a winter challenge. (No I did not forget about the oil consumption issue challenge with some applications/engines. Just don't have the issue personally, so I am not expending any grey matter on the issue)
__________________

2005 X5 4.8IS
The Blue ones are always FASTER....

Current Garage:
2005 X5 4.8is
2002 M5 TiSilver
2003 525iT
1998 528i
Former Garage Stable Highlights
2004 325XiT Sport
1973 De Tomaso Pantera, L Model
1970 Dodge Challenger T/A 4 sp Alpine White
1970 Dodge Challenger T/A 4 sp GoManGo Green
1971 Dart Sport, “Dart Light” package
1969 Road Runner 383
1968 Ply Barracuda 340S FB Sea-foam Green
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
ccv, oil separator, pcv, vacuum, ventilation

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On





All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:43 AM.
vBulletin, Copyright 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd. SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0
© 2017 Xoutpost.com. All rights reserved. Xoutpost.com is a private enthusiast site not associated with BMW AG.
The BMW name, marks, M stripe logo, and Roundel logo as well as X3, X5 and X6 designations used in the pages of this Web Site are the property of BMW AG.
This web site is not sponsored or affiliated in any way with BMW AG or any of its subsidiaries.