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  #11  
Old 11-30-2018, 06:20 PM
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I have the same problem on the same side on the same x5 4.8 lol I replaced the lower front control arm and same shit also the stoppers on the struts and compressed the spring same shit! Noise clunk. Next upper control arm or stabilizer . Let me know if you fixed. If this doesn't work new tires next
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  #12  
Old 12-01-2018, 08:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Badsmerf View Post
Funf, I have a question. How hard is it to compress the strut shaft? I've had this little rattle and replaced the lower foam piece by compressing the strut enough to slip it in before the shaft expanded again. It took some effort to push down, but seemed like it should be much stiffer. My foam pieces are fine. Replaced end links and tension arm, thinking about trying lower control arm next. Just haven't had the time for a few months.
It’s a little hard to describe in words. But the photos are in this thread

https://xoutpost.com/bmw-sav-forums/...build-diy.html

The front springs are pretty stiff. I used a brand new spring compressor (i.e. well lubed) and a 1/2 ratchet.

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

One end of the spring compressor was in a vice at table height. As the spring compressed the effort increased considerably. Near the end I had to hold down on the strut as I pulled up on the ratchet.

I assume the “lower foam piece” you replaced was #4 in the parts diagram. If so…. How did you compress the spring? Did you cut it to slip it around the shock?

Funf Dreisig
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  #13  
Old 12-01-2018, 10:58 AM
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I didn't need to compress the spring. Take off the nut when wheel is on the ground. Jack it up, take off the wheel. Then, I was able to compress only the strut by putting my Allen in and compressing it enough to slip the new one in underneath. I just cut the old and pulled it out.

I'm just wondering if the strut should be that easy to compress. Maybe it is my faulty part. You had new struts, how stiff were they? How about the old ones?
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  #14  
Old 12-01-2018, 12:40 PM
ard ard is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Badsmerf View Post
I didn't need to compress the spring. Take off the nut when wheel is on the ground. Jack it up, take off the wheel. Then, I was able to compress only the strut by putting my Allen in and compressing it enough to slip the new one in underneath. I just cut the old and pulled it out.

I'm just wondering if the strut should be that easy to compress. Maybe it is my faulty part. You had new struts, how stiff were they? How about the old ones?

Wow. 'Your bad part'????

Funf is using pictures and part numbers to be very precise about a complex collection of components.... You are using loose words, refering to parts as 'one', an 'allen'... Compressing 'only the strut' ....etc....

You don't need pictures of yours...there are hundreds of part blow ups online, even with numbers....pretty easy to use one and refer to these numbers.....
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  #15  
Old 12-01-2018, 01:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ard View Post
Wow. 'Your bad part'????

Funf is using pictures and part numbers to be very precise about a complex collection of components.... You are using loose words, refering to parts as 'one', an 'allen'... Compressing 'only the strut' ....etc....

You don't need pictures of yours...there are hundreds of part blow ups online, even with numbers....pretty easy to use one and refer to these numbers.....
I didn't remember asking you, or your nasty tone... I obviously have a bad part somewhere in this suspension system. If I need to be more precise for clarification I will. Why do you treat people so poorly?
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  #16  
Old 12-01-2018, 04:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Badsmerf View Post
I didn't need to compress the spring. Take off the nut when wheel is on the ground. Jack it up, take off the wheel. Then, I was able to compress only the strut by putting my Allen in and compressing it enough to slip the new one in underneath. I just cut the old and pulled it out.

I'm just wondering if the strut should be that easy to compress. Maybe it is my faulty part. You had new struts, how stiff were they? How about the old ones?
When you loosen the nut in the engine compartment (at the top of the strut) with the wheel on the ground. You are using the X5 as the spring compressor. If you later remove the wheel you have essentially disassembled the strut/spring combo. There are several problems with this procedure…

1 - you still can’t see/inspect the condition of parts number 7 or 8 in the parts diagram (that Philly42 posted)
2 - you can’t be sure that the spring re-seats correctly into part 5 when you let the X5 back down.

In the thread I linked, you can see that the original shock absorber was shorter than the Bilstein replacement. I think that this difference in length was not by design, but rather due to wear. Basically, at rest the old shock was just hanging there. So it didn’t begin absorbing the shock until the wheel had already started upward. In contrast the Bilstein was already under some compression, resisting upward movement even at rest.

In the same thread you can see that the extra length of the Bilstein meant that the flange on part #1 (the strut/shock) was not touching part #4 or the spring when I started tightening the nut at the top of the strut/shock. So if you had to pry the flange down to insert part #4, your struts/shocks are probably “shot”.

I would replace both front struts/shocks and parts number 7, 8 and 10. That’s what I did. And our 2009 X5 35d now drives like a loaner

Funf Dreisig
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  #17  
Old 12-01-2018, 05:40 PM
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OOPs my bad. I thought I had posted this photo in the linked thread but…


The attached photo compares the length of the org strut/shock to the new Bilstein. Essentially when I installed the Bilstein I pre-loaded it by roughly 1.5“ before installation on the X5. Where it got loaded even more by the weight of the X5.

Funf Dreisig
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  #18  
Old 12-01-2018, 05:59 PM
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You are right, I could not see the condition of part 7. I replaced the "doughnut" part 8, but it really wasn't in bad condition. Part 10 on the top of the assembly was perfectly fine, with almost no wear. Since I left the bearing support flange connected, I didn't have to mess with the spring at all, so the alignment shouldn't have changed. I simply pushed the shaft of the strut in far enough to slip the new doughnut in, then guided the shaft back through the bearing support flange and reassembled. I was going for a cheap and easy fix... didn't work this time.

If the culprit is a weak strut, I will replace the parts you listed. From what I've read, if you do one side, you should do both. Just been trying to verify before I spend the cash and effort. If I shouldn't be able to compress the shaft that easily, that will be enough to convince me.
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  #19  
Old 12-01-2018, 06:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FunfDreisig View Post
OOPs my bad. I thought I had posted this photo in the linked thread but…


The attached photo compares the length of the org strut/shock to the new Bilstein. Essentially when I installed the Bilstein I pre-loaded it by roughly 1.5“ before installation on the X5. Where it got loaded even more by the weight of the X5.

Funf Dreisig
Definitely a difference. How much were they and where did you get them?
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  #20  
Old 12-01-2018, 06:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Badsmerf View Post
Definitely a difference. How much were they and where did you get them?
I purchased both front struts/shocks (Bilstein B4) and part numbers 7 and 8 (BMW original) from ECS Tuning. The all up bill was $378.20.

I bought both parts #10 at a local dealer, because they were on back order at ECS Tuning and I want to get the job done that weekend

FWIW I believe that the failure of the Upper and Lower Guide Supports (parts #8 & 10) are due to a combination of age and the wear/tear on the strut/shock absorber. In other words, as the strut/shock wears out it transfers more impact onto the Guide Supports. Eventually they get pounded enough to disintegrate into the orange power. Think -- Canary in the coal mine.

Funf Dreisig
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